Halloween Costume Contest 2014

Halloween Costume Contest 2014

It's that time of year again! With wagging tails, we bring you our second annual Halloween Costume Contest! 

To enter, just post a picture of your dressed-up pooch on the Halloween Contest pack right on Finding Rover. 

You have a chance to win two Finding Rover T-shirts, and bask in the glory of your everlasting fame on Finding Rover! 

The Finding Rover team will pick the winning photo based on

  1. Amount of likes on your post
  2. Quality of photo
  3. Creativity of costume
  4. Contentment of your canine 
  5. BONUS: A scene to put your costume in context 

The 2014 Halloween Costume Contest starts October 21st and end at midnight on October 31st! Post your photo on Finding Rover now! 

Get inspired. Here are last year's Top 3!

Jonah's Tank the Fiesta Flamenco Dancer

Jonah's Tank the Fiesta Flamenco Dancer

Kimberly's Bubba the Hero Firefighter

Kimberly's Bubba the Hero Firefighter

Tammy's Bessie Lou the Candy Corn

Tammy's Bessie Lou the Candy Corn

And more...

  

No Comments. Add yours! | Permalink

Top 12 Reasons to Adopt a Dog

Top 12 Reasons to Adopt a Dog

October is Adopt-A-Dog Month! Although we celebrate adoption all year round, why not make this month extra special with a list of one dozen top reasons to adopt a dog (or two or three!) 

Top 12 Reasons to Adopt-A-Dog:

1. Save lives! Adopting one shelter pet can make room for another pet to be saved

2. End pet homelessness  

3. Save a lot of money

4. Most pets are fully vaccinated before leaving the shelter or rescue

(saving you vet costs)

5. Most pets are altered (spayed or neutered) before leaving the shelter or rescue

(saving you another vet visit)

6. Receive companionship and unconditional love

7. Be more active 

8. Gain a sense of responsibility 

9. Reap the benefits of your tax dollars

Most animal shelters are government agencies funded by the public

10. Most pets have experienced some sort of training

For example: simple commands, house/potty trained, leash trained, crate trained, or more

11. Most pets get microchipped before leaving the shelter or rescue

(saving your wallet from an additional hit)

12. More and more pets are becoming automatically pre-registered on Finding Rover!! 

Where can I adopt a dog?! 

  • - A visit to your local animal shelter is a great place to start. If you do a web search to find a shelter near you, and you're not having much luck, try other key words like "animal services," "animal control," or "animal care." These government agencies are the first responders when animal-welfare issues arise in your community. The majority of their funding comes from your tax dollars.
  • - Rescue organizations! These groups pull pets from the shelters in your area and care for them until a forever home is found. If your heart is set on a certain breed, there are NUMEROUS breed-specific rescues in most major cities. Rescues care for pets of all ages, so you know you can find a pet that will fit your lifestyle. 
  • - Right on Finding Rover, you can view adoptable dogs in your area from local shelters and rescues! See all the dogs listed in real time on the Finding Rover “Nearby” tab. If you want your shelter or rescue to show their adoptable dogs on Finding Rover please email Partners@FindignRover.com. It’s FREE!

Can't adopt? Consider fostering a pet! Rescue groups are often dependent on foster pet-parents to temporarily house homeless pets. Plus, it's FREE. In most cases, foster pet-parents are supported by the rescue's funds, so all you have to do is provide a safe, loving, nurturing home to a pet in need. 

Did you adopt your dog?! We want to hear your story! Post here or on the Finding Rover pack "Rescue Stories" 

No Comments. Add yours! | Permalink

Autumn in the Air - Owner Beware

Autumn in the Air - Owner Beware

September 23rd marks the first day of fall! Although we are looking forward to pumpkin-spiced-everything and sweater weather, we want to make sure Rover stays safe this autumn. 

With Fall's changing climate and upcoming holidays, there are a few dangers to be aware of:

1. Antifreeze is a killer.

Via AutoFocus.ca

Via AutoFocus.ca

Use caution when preparing your car for the cold weather ahead, and avoid antifreeze leaking on your garage flood or driveway. If Rover ingests this stuff, an emergency trip to the vet is in order.

2. Nick-nack-patty-wack DON’T give a dog a bone.

Bones cannot be digested and can cause serious damage to your dog’s stomach. When a bone is chewed and broken, it can create sharp shards that are dangerous for your pooch.

3. Toxic, wild mushrooms abound.

All mushrooms are toxic to dogs, and mushrooms love to grow in the fall. Symptoms of mushroom poisoning include, but not limited to: mild vomiting, diarrhea, severe digestive problems, and complete liver failure.

 4. Not-so-fun sized candy.

As Halloween approaches, it is even more important to make sure the candy is out of pups reach. The top three deadly treats include: chocolate, raisins, and sugar-free sweetener often called “xylitol.” Not only can candy damage your dogs’ organs, but their wrappers can cause intestinal blockage, as well. If your dog shows signs of lethargy, diarrhea, or vomiting, a trip to the vet may be in order due to consuming candy.

5. Creepy crawlers not welcome.

Spiders seem to make their debut in the Fall, and some can be extremely poisonous. Bug spray around the perimeter of your home to prevent spiders from venturing inside. Spider bites from a brown recluse or black widow cause sharp pain at the site of the bite. Shortly following, the dog can develop intense excitability, fever, weakness, and muscle and joint pains. Seizures, shock, and death can occur, especially with the bite of a black widow. An antivenin is available to treat these bites. If your dog exhibits agitation, face scratching, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, collapse, or seizures, take him at once to the nearest vet for treatment of anaphylactic shock. Great tips here

6. Do you want to build a snowman?

As temperatures drop, bring Rover inside!! If you’re cold, they’re cold. Make a dog area with toys, blankets, and a dog bed in your laundry room or garage if you do not want your dog roaming the house. If your dog starts to get restless and distructive, play a game of fetch up-and-down the stairs. This exercise can burn energy without having to brave the elements. 

Source

AUTUMN2014.jpg

Now that you know the risks, go reap the rewards! Have fun this fall, and roll in a pile of leaves! 

No Comments. Add yours! | Permalink

Natural Disaster Preparedness Month

Natural Disaster Preparedness Month

September is Natural Disaster Preparedness Month! 

Natural disasters are hard to predict and difficult to control, but when we have a plan in place, we can manage the chaos much more effectively. Just as you have registered your dog on Finding Rover before he takes himself on a walk, it is important to have a Disaster Kit handy for both you and your pet. 

Creating a Disaster Preparedness Kit for your family can be relatively quick and easy because the majority of supplies can be found around the house. Ready.gov has great resources to help your family get prepared and create a well-rounded kit.

Dog Disaster Preparedness Kit 

  • 1. Water, one gallon of water per dog per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • 2. Food, at least a three-day supply of dry, hard dog food sealed in waterproof container
  • 3. Additional First aid kit (click for more)
  • 4. Dog life jacket for flooding and storm protection 
  • 5. Glow-stick "necklace" around dog's neck to help you and your dogs see in the dark for power outage preparation 
  • 6. Dog booties with hard sole to protect your dogs paws from dangerous debris on the ground from storms, earthquakes, and fire debris 
  • 7. Dog collar and/or harness with identification tags should always be on your dog at all times 

General Disaster Preparedness Kit 

  • 1. Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • 2. Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • 3. Manual can opener for food
  • 4. Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • 5. Flashlight and extra batteries
  • 6. First aid kit
  • 7. Whistle to signal for help
  • 8. Towels and blankets
  • 9. Cell phone with chargers and/or solar charger
Containers for dog food. Found at local dollar store.

Containers for dog food. Found at local dollar store.

Glow-sticks for identification and seeing during a power outage. (Not to replace a collar) Found at local dollar store.

Glow-sticks for identification and seeing during a power outage. (Not to replace a collar) Found at local dollar store.

Hard-sole booties for paw protection from earthquake, fire, or storm damage. Found at local pet supply store.

Hard-sole booties for paw protection from earthquake, fire, or storm damage. Found at local pet supply store.

Life jacket for flood safety.  Found at local pet supply store.

Life jacket for flood safety.  Found at local pet supply store.

Now that you're thoroughly prepared, take a deep breath! Natural disasters can be scary, but your family can have peace of mind when all your ducks are in a row.

Source.

Source.

What else would you add to a Natural Disaster Preparedness Kit? 

No Comments. Add yours! | Permalink

Warning: Canine Virus Outbreak

Warning: Canine Virus Outbreak

The Boston Globe reports of a deadly, highly contagious virus sweeping the Massachusetts town of Lowell

City officials warned residents Monday [August 18, 2014] to protect their pets from an outbreak of canine parvovirus that has infected 15 dogs in the neighborhoods of the Acre and Lower Highlands [Massachusetts].

The highly contagious viral disease interferes with the animal’s intestinal tract and may be fatal if left untreated, said Lowell Animal Control. Canine parvovirus is spread when a dog has contact with the vomit or feces of another infected dog.

Owners should seek veterinary attention immediately for dogs showing symptoms of lethargy, loss of appetite, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea , Lowell Animal Control said.
— Rachel Riley, Globe Correspondent; rachel.riley@globe.com
Parvo is spread when a dog has contact with the vomit or feces of another infected dog.

Parvo is spread when a dog has contact with the vomit or feces of another infected dog.

Parvo (Parvovirus) and kennel cough take the lives of many puppies and shelter dogs each year all over the United States; coast to coast. Annual vet check-ups are encouraged as more and more cases come to the surface. Please vaccinate your pets! To receive discounted vetting and vaccinations, please contact your local animal services department and veterinary offices.

Spread the word and help save a life with Finding Rover. 

No Comments. Add yours! | Permalink

Know someone who has a dog? Spread the word!